Strips of colour or chevrons

A while ago I crocheted a chevron rug for my daughter.  I used wool that I had frogged from a jumper and then bought the contrasting wool.

I was delighted when my son said he would be happy if I made him a lap rug using up scraps of wool.  He normally doesn’t ask for me to knit anything for him so I jumped at this idea.  I decided I would crochet a chevron rug as it is easy to do, no thinking required while I watch the cricket.

As soon as I arrived home I checked out the pile of left-over wool and pulled out a few colours that I thought would go together ok.

I was sorting through my 8ply box but when I finished the rug I found that I had inadvertently put in some wool that was not 8ply.  I don’t think it makes too much of a difference and the finished rug looks ok.

The pale grey is the non 8ply. You can see that the chevron is narrower.

I am happy with the result.

More knitting to use up some left over wool

I have been trying to get rid of some of the numerous left over balls of wool that I have stashed in boxes.  I am slowly diminishing the pile but there is still a way to go.  I think I will need to make a crocheted rug with the small bits of wool that I have. I would like to do one with hexagons rather than squares and I have seen some lovely examples on Pinterest.

Petals to Picots give instructions for joining the hexagons as you go.

Meet Me at Mikes shows you how to crochet a hexagon in ten minutes.

My difficulty would be that I would need to buy wool for the last round of the hexagon and the joining.  I guess I would be getting rid of scraps and I would only buy enough wool to make the rug.

In the meantime I have made a  hot water bottle cover.I also made a crocheted chevron rug for my son but will put that in another post after I have blocked the rug.

 

Some remedial work in the garden

We have a problem with moss on the so called lawn in our garden and my husband has tried to get rid of the moss but with no success so we have decided to get rid of the lawn instead.This photo gives you an idea of how poor the lawn is so we are making garden beds with pathways instead.

I started out by extending the original beds slightly

and then putting a couple of beds in the middle of the lawn.

I have only cut out the shapes and haven’t done the digging yet on this side of the garden.

This is the other side of the front garden before I started work.

I have managed to get a bit more done on this side. This is it marked out ready for digging.It is tough going as the soil is compacted and full of couch grass roots and moss.  Good exercise for me.

This is what garden websites have to say about couch grass which doesn’t get enough sun or water.

Couch lawn, however, can become straggly, form bare patches and look very poor if it does not receive enough water or nutrients (fertiliser), or is growing in the shade, which is too heavy for the lawn to tolerate.

Couch is also an invasive grass. It will require garden edging to ensure that it doesn’t begin to grow into and overtake garden beds. This is easily done through regular garden maintenance by pulling out any runners which have crept into the garden. It’s when we do not do this regular maintenance that we can begin to find Couch that may have grown excessively into our shrubs and bushes.”

One bed done, three to go.  The pathways will be done in eucalyptus chip so the finished result should be less maintenance for us.  We have ordered soil to top up the beds so they are raised above the level of the pathway.

Tuesday Travels. . .Whaligoe Steps, Caithness

On the map the Whaligoe Steps can be found at  “The Haven”.

When we returned to mainland Scotland after our trip to Shetland we stayed with my cousins at Burrigle, Forse.  We were fortunate to have our cousins show us around the lesser known parts of the countryside and the Whaligoe Steps were something I wanted to see.  I had not visited them when I used to go as a child on holiday to Burrigle so was happy to get the opportunity to visit them and learn a bit about their history.The steep steps down to the harbour are daunting at first sight but it is not too difficult a climb and well worth the effort. You can click on each photo to see more detail.

It is hard to believe that the women used to carry the baskets of herring back up the 300 steps to the top of the cliff.

The history of the Whaligoe Steps is fully described on this site at Undiscovered Scotland.

This is part of undiscovered Scotland that you definitely should see.

It has been a while.

There has been too much sport on television recently and it has played havoc with my normal routine.  The Tour de France meant I was getting to bed at unseemly hours and that was then followed by the Cricket World Cup, followed by The Ashes so the usual day activities have come to a shuddering halt.

The Ashes are still happening as only two tests have been played and there are three still to play but I am trying to get some semblance of order into my day.  It hasn’t helped that the weather has been miserable here and tempts one to stay in bed rather than get up in the morning.

Back to posting what I have been doing recently, other than spending far too much time watching television.

I will start with some of my reading during July. I did manage to get quite a few books read as the weather was not suitable for gardening.

Career of Evil by Robert GalbraithThis was the third novel in the Strike series and it was just as exciting as the other books in the series.  It didn’t really matter that this one was read out of order as they read well as stand-alone novels. I have mentioned the other novels in a previous post.

Watching You by Lisa JewellThis was a psychological thriller and I have found a new author that I thoroughly enjoy.  You will see that I have read a second book of hers this month and will be on the lookout for more.

“. . . .a suspenseful page-turner about a shocking murder in a picturesque and well-to-do English town, perfect for fans of Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train

You’re back home after four years working abroad, new husband in tow. You’re keen to find a place of your own. But for now, you’re crashing in your big brother’s spare room.

That’s when you meet the man next door. He’s the head teacher at the local school. Twice your age. Extraordinarily attractive.  You find yourself watching him. All the time. But you never dreamed that your innocent crush might become a deadly obsession.  Or that someone is watching you.

In Lisa Jewell’s latest bone-chilling suspense, no one is who they seem—and everyone has something to hide.”

Dead I Well May Be by Adrian McKintyI came across the author as recommended by Ian Rankin, I think, but I am glad I took note as I enjoyed this book even though it is not one I would normally take from the shelf as it sounded as though it was about gang warfare in America.

This is a brutal story of gangland warfare, lust, betrayal and bloody retribution.   The engaging anti-hero has few redeeming qualities other than his native Irish wit and the will to survive.
This is “Gangs of New York” for the nineties.

“This Irish bad-boy thriller — set in the hardest streets of New York City — brims with violence, greed, and sexual betrayal.”I didn’t want to go to America, I didn’t want to work for Darkey White. I had my reasons. But I went.”

“So admits Michael Forsythe, an illegal immigrant escaping the Troubles in Belfast. But young Michael is strong and fearless and clever — just the fellow to be tapped by Darkey, a crime boss, to join a gang of Irish thugs struggling against the rising Dominican powers in Harlem and the Bronx. The time is pre-Giuliani New York, when crack rules the city, squatters live furtively in ruined buildings, and hundreds are murdered each month. Michael and his lads tumble through the streets, shaking down victims, drinking hard, and fighting for turf, block by bloody block.”

A gritty read.

 

Reposting of “Tomato relish instead of sauce” in light of the death of Margaret Fulton.

Originally posted in 2017.  Thank you Margaret Fulton.

Last year I made loads of tomato sauce and this year I have also made sauce but not quite as much.  Today for a bit of a change I made relish instead.

The recipe was from Margaret Fulton’s Encyclopaedia of Food and Cookery

Margaret Fulton's Encyclopaedia of Food and CookeryWe have had this book since 1983 and it still gets referred to occasionally.

Here is the recipe I used

recipe“until the mixture is thick.” had me in a bit of a quandary as there are various stages of thick!  I did it until I thought it was thick enough and it seems to have turned out ok.  This is the first time I have done a pickle, relish or sauce that has flour as a thickener.

It was delicious on cheese.