Fixing broken links in the DNA post

I was checking the blog posts that had been viewed recently and part of that is looking at what links had been clicked.  I discovered that there were a couple of broken links on a post that I did a few years ago so I have fixed the links and here is the repaired post. This post was first published in May 2013

The ScotsI loved the cover of this book as the genetic code is set to resemble the Forth Railway Bridge, very clever.  My reason for including this book is the fact that I have been reading about a particular project taking place to trace the genetic code of Scottish folk.

One of the columns on my Tweetdeck is for Caithness, so I catch up on the latest from there.  Yesterday there was a tweet asking for people to participate in Project DNA for Caithness and Sutherland.  I clicked on the link as my dad came from Caithness.
Project DNATo participate in the project you need to visit Family Tree DNA : History unearthed daily.  Of course I should have realised that nothing comes without a cost.  To be tested for this project it has to be a male member with the family surname and the cost can vary from $49 to $339!  I don’t think I would be that keen to find out links from the past but no doubt there are those who are.

The Sutherland DNA Surname Research Project provides further information on the surname and some interesting links to other sites and at no cost!  There, that’s my Scottish traits coming to the fore again!

To put it all into perspective you need to read this article.guardian articleAn excerpt from the article:

Perhaps it is harmless fun to speculate beyond the facts, armed with exciting new DNA technologies? Not really. It costs unwitting customers of the genetic ancestry industry a substantial amount of hard-earned cash, and it disillusions them about science and scientists when they learn the truth, which is almost always disappointing relative to the story they were told.

Exaggerated claims from the consumer ancestry industry can also undermine the results of serious research about human genetic history, which is cautiously and slowly building up a clearer picture of the human past for all of us.

All the links are now working again.

Memories stirred when cleaning out the computer documents.

A couple of days ago I spent nearly a whole morning working on tidying up documents on my computer.  I had been looking for a particular document on the computer and realised that I had a lot of “stuff” on the computer that I no longer needed.  I guess it was a bit like cleaning out a filing cabinet.

I did get rid of a great number of documents but while doing that I discovered documents that I had forgotten about.  One folderr of many documents is my mother’s book of memories.  When my mum died I scanned the whole book,105 pages, so that each member of the family would have a copy of what my mum had written.  The scanned pages were put on a CD.  I knew I had the scanned document on the computer but it was a while since I last looked at it.

What lovely memories it brought back.

Just the first page starts you on the journey of her memories.

Although I don’t have the physical copy of the book I can still read it when ever I want to and it is here for my children and grandchildren when they want to look at it.

 

Family Tree DNA – Caithness and Sutherland

The Scots

I loved the cover of this book as the genetic code is set to resemble the Forth Railway Bridge, very clever.  My reason for including this book is the fact that I have been reading about a particular project taking place to trace the genetic code of Scottish folk.

One of the columns on my Tweetdeck is for Caithness, so I catch up on the latest from there.  Yesterday there was a tweet asking for people to participate in Project DNA for Caithness and Sutherland.  I clicked on the link as my dad came from Caithness.
Project DNA

To participate in the project you need to visit Family Tree DNA : History unearthed daily.  Of course I should have realised that nothing comes without a cost.  To be tested for this project it has to be a male member with the family surname and the cost can vary from $49 to $339!  I don’t think I would be that keen to find out links from the past but no doubt there are those who are.

The Sutherland DNA Surname Research Project provides further information on the surname and some interesting links to other sites and at no cost!  There, that’s my Scottish traits coming to the fore again!

To put it all into perspective you need to read this article.guardian articleAn excerpt from the article:

Perhaps it is harmless fun to speculate beyond the facts, armed with exciting new DNA technologies? Not really. It costs unwitting customers of the genetic ancestry industry a substantial amount of hard-earned cash, and it disillusions them about science and scientists when they learn the truth, which is almost always disappointing relative to the story they were told.

Exaggerated claims from the consumer ancestry industry can also undermine the results of serious research about human genetic history, which is cautiously and slowly building up a clearer picture of the human past for all of us.

A thoughtful response to my post about a mother’s reaction

This response is from my daughter, Fiona, and tells of her reasoning behind her tattoo.

Fiona's tattoo

My tattoo is the reflection of who I am, where I have come from and the knowledge that I will always have somewhere that I belong, no matter what choices or mistakes I may make in my life. That I am loved unconditionally and without judgement and that my parents and grandparents have shaped who I am, moulding my values and nurturing my strengths.

 

The upper script of the tattoo, ‘Sans Peur’ is the motto of the Clan Sutherland, my Mother’s maiden name, and translates to ‘Without Fear’. My Granny, my Grandad and my Mother taught me that no matter what your choices, your family will always love you for who you are and not the mistakes you might make along the way.

 

My Mother has raised my siblings and myself with these same qualities. She shows us unfailing love and understanding and never judges us for the decisions that we may make. She faces life ‘without fear’ and has taught us to do the same, following what we believe in and embracing all that life has to offer.

 

The lower section of the tattoo, ‘Factis Non Verbis’ is the motto of the 39th Battalion, the Battalion that my Father’s father, my Grandpa, served in during the Second World War, and translates to ‘Deeds Not Words’. My Grandpa served in Kokoda during WW2 and although I know very little about his experiences, I am eternally grateful for the sacrifices that he made to protect his country. My Grandpa and my Father have taught me that doing the honourable thing, while not always easy, makes you a stronger person. Following this belief has made me happy with who I am, giving me the confidence to make difficult decisions throughout my life, always remembering that it is not what you say, but what you do in life that makes you who you are.

 

My Father and my Mother, both represented in my tattoo, come at the head and tail of a graphic representation of myself. The design is based on the Liberty of London ‘Ianthe’ print. As my middle name is ‘Ianthe’, and I am the product of both my Mother and my Father, the design is located between the two to represent me, my sense of belonging and my family.

You can see from the photo that it is a very discreet tattoo, done in white ink not pink as I had said.