The happiest refugee

Time to repost this blog post from 2014.

Gippsland Granny

I borrowed this book from the library.  I had read a great deal in the media about this book a few years ago but only now have I got round to borrowing it.

the happiest refugee

Australia, at the moment is going through a period where petty politics is playing a large part when it comes to people seeking asylum here. I wont get into the debate but I will say that Australia is a huge country and surely there is enough room and resources for those seeking asylum.  

Anh Do is an Australian comedian and started off by doing shows on what it was like to be an immigrant in an immigrant family in Australia.

His book tells of his life as he grew up in Australia as a poor, Vietnamese refugee.  He also tells how his family escaped Vietnam in a boat and the difficulties that entailed.

This is a very easy book to read…

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‘Tis the silly season. . . .

Silly mid-on, silly mid-off etc.  Australia is in the throws of an Ashes Series so cricket is at the top of my agenda at the moment.

I might mention that the Big Bash League is also in full swing.  I thought that there could be no better time to read this autobiography.I am really enjoying the read and at the same time I am learning a bit about the way a cricket team operates behind the scenes and the relationships among the players in a team.  It is an entertaining read and is a bare all account of his cricketing career.  He has been controversial at times and it was interesting to read his version of various events.

If you are a cricket fan then this is well worth a read.

 

 

Money makes the world go round. . . . .

We were recently in Canberra for a day and we paid a visit to the Royal Australian Mint. The picture above is the entry that we used when we visited with our children many years ago.  We were now visiting with our granddaughter and we were surprised to find that this is no longer the entry to the Mint.

There is now a fancy, ,much more touristy entry to the Mint and it is wheelchair accessible.

The entry is around the corner from these photos.

The gallery for viewing the Mint is a huge improvement on our experience back in the 1980s.  They have excellent displays and interactive exhibits.  There is a discovery booklet for children and plenty for children to see and do.

There is a robot on the work floor but unfortunately we were there during holiday time so the robot was only doing a set pattern to let people see that it actually worked.  We will need to go back when the Mint in producing money to see the robot in full action.One of the exhibits that caught my eye was the Melbourne Cup trophy from 1888.

It is such a beautiful trophy compared to the trophy the winner receives these days.

The Royal Australian Mint is certainly somewhere you should visit if you are ever in Canberra.  I will be returning when the Mint is in operation as I want to see the robot in full working mode.

 

Not one but two

Out on our front grass recently.  Not one but two echidnas.

We generally see an echidna, an Australian monotreme, at some time each year but this is the first time we have had two at the same time.

They obviously don’t feel threatened here.

Tuesday Travels. . . A Canberra attraction that is often missed by tourists

Canberra, as our nation’s capital, has many attractions for the tourists but one which is perhaps not as well known as the others is the National Archives. . . . “We are the nation’s memory – a living collection of government records illuminating our history and identity.”

It is an unprepossessing building which in its former life housed government offices and was a post office. You can read its history on the red sign shown in the photo.

The Archives building is hidden away to the back and left of old Parliament House.  It is in the Parliamentary triangle so is within easy access of the Parliament buildings, the Art Gallery, the Portrait Gallery, the High Court and Questacon – Science and Technology Centre. . . . . . .all worth a visit.

It had been a while since we had last been there so decided to pay a visit.  There was an excellent exhibition on the life of Gough Whitlam, one of our previous prime ministers.  The archives has much to commend it and I suggest you take a quick look at the National Archives of Australia website to get some idea of what to expect if you decide to visit.

I have used the online facility to research my family’s arrival in Australia.  You can get copies of documents and can make use of the reading room.  My younger daughter was able to get copies of the Defence service record of her grandpa who served on the Kokoda Track in World War 2.